Dental Premiums Are Going Up

If you’re checking out your January Leave and Earnings Statement, and trying to figure out what’s what, notice that your dental insurance premiums have gone up. It’s still great coverage at a very affordable cost, but it is more expensive.  While technically the premiums aren’t going up until 1 February 2015, Tricare Dental premiums are paid in advance, so the amount is coming out of the January pay calculations.

Active Duty

Single: new rate $11.30 per month, up $.34 from the old rate of $10.96

Family: new rate $33.88 per month, up $.99 from the old rate of $32.89

Selected Reserve and IRR (Mobilization Only)

Sponsor only: new rate $11.30 per month, up $.34 from the old rate of $10.96

Single: new rate $28.24 per month, up $.84 from the old rate of $27.40

Family: new rate $84.71 per month, up $2.48 from the old rate of $82.23

Sponsor and family: new rate $96.01 per month, up $2.82 from the old rate of $93.19

IRR (Non-Mobilization)

Sponsor only: new rate $28.24 per month, up $.84 from the old rate of $27.40

Single: new rate $28.24 per month, up $.84 from  the old rate of $27.40

Family: new rate $84.71 per month, up $2.48 from the old rate of $82.23

Sponsor and family: new rate $112.95 per month, up $3.32 from the old rate of $109.63

Service members who are paying for their dental insurance through payroll deduction from their paycheck do not need to take any action to make this change happen.  Those who are unable to set up a payroll deduction and are paying through an Electronic Funds Transfer need to check with their bank or credit union to ensure that the right amount is being deducted.

More information can be found at the Tricare website’s dental premiums page:  http://www.tricare.mil/Costs/DentalCosts/TDP/Premiums.aspx

About the Author

Kate Horrell
Kate Horrell is a military financial coach, mom of four teens, and Navy spouse. She has a background in taxes and mortgage banking, and a trove of experience helping other military families with their money. Follow her on twitter @realKateHorrell.
  • Dr. Thomas Padgett

    I am a little confused by the statement that Active Duty Servicemen and women who are single are paying for Dental insurance. The last I checked Medical and Dental were covered 100%.

    • Bethany

      The active duty “Single” rate is for one spouse or child. The “Family” rate is for 2 or more dependents. You are correct that the sponsor pays nothing.

  • Marine64

    I wouldn’t mind paying $33/month instead of the $89/month paying now for Tricare dental insurance. Would be nice. Would also help if the cap was moved from $1200/year to something reasonable like $2500/yea with less cost share on part of the patient!

  • jim hall

    what about retired military that has dental? Is it also going up?

    • ltcjwb

      Mine did not change. Still $73.88.

    • Kate

      Retiree dental coverage rates vary based upon zip code and number of people being covered. Most areas did see an increase on 1 January. You can verify your premium at this website: http://www.trdp.org/retirees/premiums.html

  • Norm I

    My retiree dental went up $1.04/mo

  • Robet brawn

    Service members who are paying for their dental insurance through payroll deduction from their paycheck do not need to take any action to make this change happen. Those who are unable to set up a payroll deduction and are paying through an Electronic Funds Transfer need to check with their bank or credit union to ensure that the right amount is being deducted.

  • The reserves and the premiums on the dental usually matters a lot while you are going to make use of those of the activities and the environments, looking to watch more of the help out of that.